Interview With Coma Twins

What was the beginning pint for your music career? How did it all start?

A: I would be very reluctant to call my musical journey a “career.” That would imply making money. Thankfully, I haven’t been playing in bands for 30 years for that reason. If you’re lucky, you break even. The beginning of my “career” started with my first band that played live. We were called, Bereavement. I was the drummer of said Doom Metal band.  Our first show was at Gazzarri’s in Hollywood. Known and made famous for hosting Glam Metal bands. We opened for a Christian Death Metal band called, Vengeance Rising. My friend, Jason Margos drove me to that gig in his Ford Fiesta. The most nervous I’ve ever been in my life.

Was there any bumps on the road? What kind of challenges did you have to deal with?

A: Like any relationship, being in a band is a constant bump in the road. Always challenges and struggles. Death and glory. What’s life worth lived without some war stories?  What kind of challenges- Way to many to name. Just surviving as a serious band is a challenge. Life is expensive. Bands are expensive. Unless you’re huge, no one wants to pay you. There’s no union for DIY punk.

What was the most fulfilling and satisfying part so far?

A: Writing, recording and performing music gave me purpose at a point where my life was spiraling out of control. At the point of sounding cliché, it saved my life. It’s all satisfying and fulfilling. Gives me a reason to get out of bed.

How would you describe the music that you typically create?

A: I feel like I have my own style but, it’s a gumbo. I love most styles of music and it all ends up in the mix however subtle. I never get sick of Pavement and Built To Spill.

What is your creative process like?

A: I beat the rug until the dust is gone.

If you could change anything about the industry, what would it be?

A: The music industry has never been a friendly place. If you have the wherewithal to navigate it, good for you. Unless, I get famous post-mortem, I’ll see you in the basement.

If you were asked to give a piece of advice to upcoming bands, what would that be?

A: Everyone has a different reason for being in a band. Hard to give advice that way. I play with people that I love. I play music that I love. I heard trade jobs are the way to go.

What has been the best performance of your career so far?

A:  All.

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